Why I Dread Halloween

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smash pumpkin

I’m not sure what I dread more: trick-or-treating in what always seems to be sub-zero temperatures (with rain), sorting through the candy and explaining over and over why she can’t eat it, the over-stimulation, or the costume, which inevitably is a character that companies only make in little kid sizes.

Ah yes, the joys of Halloween.

I’ve followed the recommendations of the experts and we’ve practiced what to say, talked about what Halloween is, and there were several years that, despite all the preparation, we’d greet each household with either “Candy pleeeeeasssse,” a big hug or dashing into a stranger’s home.

Today we are at a point where my pre-teen now yells “Trick or treat!” with all of the other kids and (mostly) doesn’t get upset when I offer alternate treats that are gluten/dairy free in exchange for her candy (which we send to a group that coordinates sending leftover candy to armed services members who are overseas).

The hard part is usually the costume choice – she generally falls in love with a character where costumes are made for kids smaller than she is, and this year we have the added complexity of wearing a bulky scoliosis brace.  So, as with so much in our life, we improvise.

This year she wants to be Poppy from the Trolls movie – so I’ve created something that is Poppy-esque, inexpensive and reusable.  I started with this great tutorial from the How to Mom, using a headband, pink tulle, some foam flowers from the dollar store and my hot glue gun.

poppy 2 (2)

Paring a long sleeved pink tee shirt (that is oh-so-soft and can be worn again) with a tutu that matches Poppy’s color scheme (that she’ll wear comfy leggings underneath) topped with Poppy hair – BOOM, we have a costume!

poppy 3 (2)

Now all I need to do is put on my hat, gloves and a smile.  Happy Halloween!

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